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Collecting and Analyzing Data

Sarah Foster

University of Tennessee, Knoxville


Abstract

Leesburg Public Library is a member library of the Lake County Library System located in Central Florida. The library provides several services to the Leesburg city community, Lake County community, and seasonal residents. The Leesburg Library Literary Guild (LLLG) is an adult book club service provided by the Leesburg Public Library to Lake County Library System card holders. This service has been offered by the adult services department since 2010, and provides two chapters with twelve members in each. This assignment will critique and analyze the user-centered assessment given to LLLG book club users (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

Collecting and Analyzing Data
Conduct community analysis and implement your evaluation action plan to gather feedback from users about your selected PL service under study. Report in terms of the following: Summarize and report findings (question-by-question) based on data gathered while conducting user-centered assessment/evaluation about your selected PL service. If applicable, provide transcription of data collected as an appendix. (Provide other forms of data collected).

6.1 Critique and analyze data collected: Discuss and report user feedback about the PL service in terms of their needs and information experiences, availability and access, barriers/challenges faced in using the select service, kinds of benefits in using the service, suggestions for improving the service, etc.

The Leesburg Public Library has provided the Leesburg Library Literary Guild (LLLG) book club services to Lake County Library System card holders since 2010. The purpose of the survey is to determine if 2014-2015 book club procedures are effective at meeting customer expectations. Currently the library does not provide library staff led book club discussions or stay for the meetings. Customers are requesting to have library staff actively participate and lead book discussions. Data needs to be gathered to determine if current book club structure is meeting the needs of the customer, without a library staff leader (Matthews, 2007, p.9). The LLLG book club has twenty-two registered members. Quantitative analysis was conducted on 2014-2015 LLLG book club sign in sheets to determine how many registered users were inactive (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). Inactivity was determined to be users who had not recently used the book club services and attended less than three of the nine meetings. Four of the twenty-two registered users were deemed inactive. Eighteen paper surveys were given out to active LLLG book club members at the beginning of book club meetings on April the 7th and 8th. Three of the eighteen users were not able to attend the meetings and received the survey when they came for the next book. A total of seventeen out of eighteen surveys were returned.

The first question was, "How long have you been a member of the LLLG book club?" This was a short answer question to gather demographic information (Matthews, 2007, p.52). The data was used to divide the surveys into two groups, a control group of users who have been a part of the book club for two years or less, and an experimental group of users who have been a part of the book club for three years or more. This division was made to compare responses of users who had experienced book club services when there was a library staff leader from 2010-2013, and those who had not had this experience from 2013-2015. A margin of error was discovered in response to this question when analyzed with others. Several answers did not count the current year in its response. The researcher first analyzed just the responses to question one. Users who answered "from the beginning", four, and three were placed into the experimental group. Users who answered "new", two, and one were placed into the control group. A pie graph was made of the data which recorded duration of membership, seven out of seventeen or 41% replied four years, two out of seventeen or 12% replied three years, three out of seventeen or 17% replied two years, three out of seventeen or 18% replied one year, and two out of seventeen or 12% did not respond. Based on these statistics the experimental group consist of nine out of seventeen or 53%, and the control group consist of six out of seventeen or 35%. The book club has been established for the last five years, when counting the current year (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). Surveys were re-evaluated, to retrieve a more accurate analysis of dividing users into experimental group and control group. Survey responses that stated information such as, Linda, library leadership, or have been a member of the book club for four or three years were place in the three to five years membership experimental group. All other surveys were placed in the zero to two years membership control group. Results showed that eleven out of seventeen surveyed have been members for the past three to five years at 65%, and six out of seventeen have been members for the past zero to two years at 35%. For some of the continuing questions comparisons will be made between responses from the 65% in the experimental group, and 35% in the control group.

Users who have been a part of the book club for the last three to five years (experimental group) produce a unique challenge of expectations based on their experiences. This section of the users request library staff leadership services in the book club meetings that the library no longer offers. Their view point of the current years services will be skewed based on previous experiences. Users who have been a part of the book club for the last zero to two years (control group) do not reflect the same expectations, and experiences will be a better reflection of current book club services (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

The second question was, "Please mark the best description of your primary residence." This was a multiple choice question to gather demographic information (Matthews, 2007, p.52). A pie chart was used to visually show the percentages of those surveyed who are Leesburg city, Lake County, and Out of State residents. There are three groups of users, primary are Leesburg residents at 67%, secondary are Lake County residents at 22%, and tertiary are out of state residents at 11%. The LLLG book club service is only offered during the winter months of September to April. This is primarily because the library serves a large "snowbird" population who are not present during the summer months of April to August. Secondarily, the library offers a large Adult Summer Reading Program that encompasses staff time, programing space, and programming time. 89% of the book club users stated that their primary residence was in Lake County. The Adult Services Supervisor has planned for the coming year Adult Summer Reading Program to
"Offer two book informal discussions: a fiction book scheduled in the morning, facilitated by a staff member, and a non-fiction book on an evening, facilitated by a local retired teacher. I chose "Unbroken" for the nonfiction title because of its popularity and potential for appeal to men, and the facilitator is a man. (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015)"
Advertisement of the Adult Summer Reading Program open book discussions should be advertised to the book club members who remain in the Lake County area in the summer. Further evaluation of the success of the summer book discussions will help in making informed decision on an alternative way of offering book club services. Overall, the open book discussion forum during the summer may be a good secondary program for book club members in the summer.

One survey had marked both Leesburg and out of state as primary residency. A statement of clarification was written stating (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015), "Plantation 8 mos. Pennsylvania 4mos." Based on this response a margin of error was assessed. The question was supposed to find out how many of the book club members year round residency was in Leesburg or Lake County versus members whose residency is in Lake County in winter and out of state in the summer. The question may be better phrased if a clarifying statement was added stating, "If you live out of state during the summer months please mark 'out of state'."

The availability of book club services have been limited to the months of September to April for the last five years. One reason for this was that some of the users are only residents in the Lake County area for the winter months. The second question's data shows that 89% of the users (not considering the margin of error) remain in the Lake County area during the summer. Availability of book club services could be expanded to the summer months by either offering a smaller book club or offering an open forum book club (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

The third question was, "How did you learn about the Leesburg Public Library book club?" This was a multiple choice question to gather an operational viewpoint of the effectiveness to advertise book club services (Matthews, 2007, p.5). Data was gathered into a pie chart to show visually the percentages of the users as a whole each individually learned about the program. There were five choices, 35% choose flyer/display, 24% choose library staff, 23% choose friend, 12% choose asked, and 6% choose other. The one response of other has been a part of the book club "from the beginning", and also stated that she "kept bugging desk to start a club. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)"All but one of the users who responded "flyer/ display" were a part of the experimental group. Five out of the eleven in the experimental group learned about the book club through other means such as library staff, friend, and asked. Out of the six members in the control group, one choose display/flyer, two choose library staff, two choose friend, and one choose asked. 47% of the users were informed about the book club by word of mouth from library staff or a friend. A surprisingly small percentage of users just "asked" about the book club.

One of the barriers of the book club services is the lack of advertisement. The LLLG chapter two book club has had two openings for the last two years. Analysis showed that only five of the nine registered members are actively participating in the LLLG chapter two book club. Whereas the, chapter one book club is at full capacity of twelve active members. Advertisement will have to be strategically planned so as to focus recruitment for the chapter two book club that meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. There is a limited number of slots that are available because of space and availability of materials. Majority of users became aware of the book club through word of mouth. Focusing advertisement by word of mouth or flyers and displays only showing availability in the chapter two book club could increase chapter two book club enrollment. Current efforts should continue such as, wait list individuals getting first chance to join available spots in the book club for next year, and library staff taking names and contact information of those interested (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

The fourth question was, "Are you a member of another book club? If so, How many? If you attend another book club in Lake County, will you please share the name and location?" This is a short answer question to assess factual information about the LLLG book club's competition (Matthews, 2007, p.63). The question is library-centric so as to learn about what other book clubs are in the community so that the Leesburg Public Library's book club kits can be advertised to the local book clubs, in order to increase use (Matthews, 2007, p.5). Five out of the seventeen members attend another book club. Only one attends a book club in Leesburg, two attend a book club in Lake County, and two attend book clubs out of state. Book clubs listed were "private Howey-in-the-Hills", "Mount Dora second Tuesday book group", and "Pennbrooke Fairway book club" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). In order to increase availability and access to the book club kits, an announcement to book club members by email or in person should be made about the library's service to loan out used book club kits to local community book clubs.

The fifth question was, "How would you describe the atmosphere of the book club discussions? Would you suggest the book club to others?". This is an open-ended question to assess the experiences and feelings of the book club members (Matthews, 2007, p.51-52). Five out of six members placed in the control group responded that they would recommend the book club to others. Only four described the atmosphere of the book club in summary as, "very relaxed, friendly, satisfied, excellent, interesting, respectful, and full participation. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" Eight of the eleven members in the experimental group responded that they would recommend the book club to others. All members described the atmosphere of the book club in summary as, "balanced, lively, courteous, thorough, open, encouraging, full participation, positive, accepting, friendly, supportive, interesting, wonderful, respectful, sharing personal experiences, relaxed, stimulating, good, varying perspectives, and sometimes comfortable. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" One of the members in the experimental group mentioned that the atmosphere was, "relaxing and with great discussions even without a facilitator. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" While both groups gave only positive feedback it can be seen based on the numbers of who responded that because of the experiences of the experimental group that there was a greater response to the question that was more insightful as to the dynamics of the book club. Although answers were still skewed, as can be seen by the response about having a facilitator, on past experiences versus current ones. Overall the book club atmosphere was described, based on frequency of word use, as relaxed, friendly, respectful, interesting, and lively.

From these responses it can be deduced that the book club successfully meets the library's mission to, "Enriching our community with service excellence to provide information, recreation, and lifelong learning opportunities. (City of Leesburg, 2012, pg.1)" Based on the information experiences of the users benefits of using the service reflects the book club service's goal to be a place to share a love of literature and discuss in a fun, intellectual, comfortable, and respectful environment (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

The sixth question was, "How well did the 2014-2015 book club meet your expectations?" This is an open-ended question designed to assess the users feelings, opinion and value given to the service (Matthews, 2007, p.51-52). One of the six members apart of the control group stated, "I'm new" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). This member just recently joined the group (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). The other five responses varied from positive, and semi positive remarks. Positive remarks included, "exceeded", "very well", and "I like it" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). The semi positive remark was "fine" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). Additional remarks from users were, "I read books I would have never have considered if I did not belong", and "I like the small group setting, you get to hear everyone take on the book. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" One of the eleven members apart of the experimental group did not respond to the question. Three out of eleven responses were not positive such as, "ok", "did not enjoy two or three of the selections", and "alright but I wish our membership would increase" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). Four out of eleven responses were semi-positive remarks such as, "good", "I enjoyed it, but.", and "it did" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). Three of the semi-positive remarks had clarifying statements about wanting a "leader-librarian" or "missing Linda" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). Linda was the Adult Services Library Assistant three years ago who lead the book club from 2010-2013 (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). Her contribution to the book club can best be described by one of the responses, "I enjoyed it, but really missed having Linda leading the discussions with such professionalism and extensive background information. She guided the discussion to keep on topic and include everyone. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" Three out of eleven responses contained position remarks, such as "yes, especially with the diversity of members", "very well", and "A+" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). For this question control group responses provide the clearest perspective of the 2014-2015 expectations. A total of three responses were skewed by comparisons from previous years. Although these comparisons are important, the survey is supposed to be a reflection of this year's services not previous years. Experiences of members is what sets their expectations, which is why more in depth responses were given from the experimental group.

The overall responses for the sixth question varied from "ok" to "very well" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). This should be an area of concern. Four overall expectations were mentioned in the responses: attendance of members, library leadership, selection of books, and diversity/ input from all members. Of those four areas the library could look at ways of improving membership and alternatives for library leadership. That may include gathering information on the author, and book club discussion points to give to members for their discussions. This would also enhance book club kits to outside users.

The seventh question was, "Was correspondence from the library staff helpful? Too frequent or not frequent enough? Was there any information you would have like to have known about the library or book club that was not shared?" This question was open-ended to collect qualitative responses to deduce the effectiveness of correspondence, and quantitative response to deduce the efficiency of the correspondence (Matthews, 2007, p.12). One out of the seventeen responses did not give an answer, this was the new member. One response stated only, "No" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). It is assumed that she was answering the last part of the question. Two out of the seventeen gave feedback for improvement such as, "Not frequent enough in beginning of year but improved this spring." and" Yes- perhaps 2 or 3 days earlier. I got my e-mail this a.m. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" Fourteen of seventeen responses gave positive statements. Most just answered "yes", "perfect", and "helpful" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). One response summarizes the majority of statements which was, "The information provided during the 2014-2015 year has been timely, informative, and all questions were answered quickly and completely. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" It should be advised to continue to give monthly emails before and after the meetings. Improvement should be made in sending emails and calling two or three days before a meeting.

The eighth question was, "Please rate by check marking each question below on the quality of service." For this quantitative question a Likert scale will be made that scales the quality of the overall program, meeting space, access to books, library staff, and meeting times, on a scale of excellent, above average, average, below average, and poor (Matthews, 2007, p.66). Library staff received the lowest rating of "average" by one user who also stated, "wish there was a leader-librarian" (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). All categories but "overall program" received a more than 50% rating of "excellent". "Overall program" received good marks but only a 35% in "excellent". Based on the whole survey, areas to improve book club services would be earlier communication, finding new alternatives for library staff leadership, and recruiting more book club members by word of mouth or advertising.

6.2 Improvement strategies: Present a plan for improvement strategies to implement in relation to the selected service for the PL to follow based on the data that you collected during this study. Develop a categorization scheme for the improvement strategies under different headings as appropriate (e.g., web representation, training, marketing to users, etc.).

Library Involvement:

Users of the book club services have requested that the library provide another library staff member to lead the book club discussions similar to the leadership provided three years ago. The leading book club discussions is not a part of Adult Services staff current job duties. Leading the book club would be an elective service performed, just as it was with Linda. With limited staff, and time the library is not able to provide this added amenity to the book club services. Other forms of indirect leadership of the book club members needs could be established. The Adult Services Supervisor has encouraged book club members to take over leading the book club discussions. In order to give the book club members the confidence to take over this role the library should provide the initial discussion materials. Providing to the book club members a list of discussion questions, and background information about the author would place the materials to lead a book discussion in the user's hands without needing a library staff member to present it (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

Resources:

The library provides the book club members access to regular print, large print, audio, and eBook formats of the books for meetings (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). 76% of users answered "quality of access to books" as "excellent" and 24% "above average". The library adding to that resource a book package with discussion questions and author background information may provide the users the confidence to lead the book club discussions without a library staff leader. The book package will also enhance the book club kit services. By making the book club kit more while with books, author background, and discussion questions this may attract more community and Lake County library book clubs to use this resource.

Marketing to Users:

The LLLG book club's each hold a capacity of twelve members. Chapter one currently has twelve active members. Chapter two currently has five active members (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015). Based on data on how users learned about book club services, 35% responded flyers and displays, and 47% by word of mouth from library staff and friends. Through strategic advertisement of book club services for just the chapter two that meets the first Tuesday of each month at 6:00pm the library should be able to increase the number of registered users in chapter two. Advertisement should include word of mouth from library staff and current users. The adult summer reading program will be hosting two open forum book discussions for 2015. After evaluation of the success of these programs, flyers could be given out to attendees about the chapter two book club services. Those who have been waitlisted should first be contacted about joining the book clubs. Library staff should continue recording names and contact information of those interested (Adults Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

Communication to Users:

Based on information gathered from the seventh question it was suggested that reminder emails about book club meetings be sent out two or three days in advance before the meeting (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015). This should be an easy change for the Adult Services Library Assistant. Although only one user made this suggestion this will benefit all of the users.

6.3 Report findings to your PL and provide feedback about their response to your findings.

The Adult Services Supervisor was appreciative of an evaluation being conducted of the book club. The relationship between the Adult Services Supervisor and book club members have been strained by the decision to not provide a library staff member to lead book club discussions. The Adult Services Supervisor first clarified the role that Linda, the former library staff book club leader, had with the book club services. Linda was a branch manager of a small library and had run a bookmobile before obtaining her position at Leesburg Public Library as an Adult Services Library Assistant. She was very involved in book groups and writers groups. With few personal priorities she was able to easily rearrange her work schedule to be able to attend every book club meeting. The leading of book club discussions has never been a part of library staff job descriptions. The Adult Services Supervisor therefore does not feel it is right to assign the task to someone unless it was the staff member's preference and passion to lead the book clubs. There is also currently not enough Adult Services library staff members or staffing time to assign someone to this role. Therefore it is only a service that is provided as an amenity to the facilitation of the book clubs when there is full staff and a staff member willing (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

The Adult Services Supervisor liked finding out that there were five members that attended another other book clubs. She was sure that some of the members were but was surprised to see how many. She agreed that sharing with the book club members the book club kits list would benefit the library with bringing more awareness about this service for other book clubs. That also, as stated in the researcher's analysis, it will only enhance the book club kits to provide book reviews, discussion questions, and author background information. By providing this information also to the book club members it may give them the confidence to take a leadership role in the book club discussions. Finding the information does not take up a lot of library time. The library already has several databases such as Novelist, and Florida Electronic Library where book reviews, author information, and discussion questions can be gathered from. Last year's usage statistics for Novelist showed that the database was used from one to thirty-seven times a month. The Adult Services Supervisor was excited about the prospect of getting more use of the database while also enhancing book club services and book club kits (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

The Adult Services Supervisor was hesitant about providing an annual survey of the book club services. She suggested that if it was to occur annually that it have varying questions each year and fewer open-ended questions. Her reasoning was that many survey takers are not comfortable with or find it cumbersome to answer open-ended questions. Based on surveys returned it can be seen that many answers to the open-ended questions were one word responses or not answered. It is also difficult to "quantify something that is not quantifiable (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015)". More preset choices and scaled responses would be easier for the user and the library to represent the data in a usable format. One specific example she gave was for changing question five to read, "Please choose all words that describe book club discussions. Words that would be given as choices would reflect the book club services goals and opposites of those goals. (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015)" If a survey was to be conducted again next year the Adult Services Supervisor would like for it to be done at the book selection meeting in March while all of the members are gathered and have more time to ponder on the questions. The survey conducted for this assignment was given at the last or second to last meeting. This took up the book club member's time for discussing the books (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

The Adult Services Supervisor was overwhelmed to see that user's responses for the eighth question reflected that meeting space, access to books, library staff, and meeting time had an over 50% excellent rating but the overall program had only a 35%. Although the ratings on "overall program" were good she would like to do a more in-depth study of why individual parts of the program were given excellent ratings but not the overall program. Her main concern is that when she took over as Adult Services Supervisor two years ago that she did not prioritize the book club services enough. She is glad that the survey was done to give her a better reflection of the book club's needs. That the implementation of a packet with book reviews, discussion questions, and author background information to book club services will give the service the extra attention that it needed to improve services (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

6.4 Critique your process: Discuss and report your process while conducting user-centered assessment in your evaluation action plan and include your observations, what worked and did not work, obstacles and challenges, etc. Provide a discussion of the most interesting facts that emerged during the process.

The evaluation action plan assisted in the smooth process of deciding which methods to include in the user-centered assessment. The biggest obstacle was developing a user-centered assessment that gathered both qualitative and quantitative information but also taking in consideration the Adult Services Supervisors wishes to not gather user's feelings on how to improve services (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 6, 2015). The researcher initially wanted to include in the evaluation two open-ended questions that would have assessed the user's opinions on how to improve the services without a library staff leader and meeting times. To work around this obstacle the researcher chose to do a Likert scale to rate the quality of the user's feelings about the book club services. This allowed for the researcher to gather quantitative information on key problems deduced in the evaluation action plan of the book club services. By providing the survey at the last book club meeting the users were able to give a whole viewpoint of the book club services experienced in 2014-2015. It worked to be able to give the paper survey to the users in person and gather at the end of the meeting. It ensured that a majority of user responses would be returned to the researcher. User responses were easily gathered into an excel document so that quick visual diagrams could be made. By dividing the user survey's into two groups, control and experimental, the researcher and Adult Services Supervisor were able to get a better analysis of the answers as compared to the users experience. The surveyed users presented a unique situation of being a small group that met regularly, and 65% having over three years of experiences of the dynamics of the book club services.

Critique of Survey:

Two users did not respond to the first question. It is assumed that the question was skipped over because of placement. There was also a large margin of error for responses to the first question. The survey should be modified by either stating in the question how long the book club has been in existence or by giving the user a multiple choice option to choose the year they started.

The second question, had one survey that marked both Leesburg and out of state as primary residency. A statement of clarification was written stating, "Plantation 8 mos. Pennsylvania 4mos. (Anonymous, personal communication, April 8, 2015)" Based on this response a margin of error should be considered. The question was supposed to find out how many of the book club members year round residency was in Leesburg or Lake County versus members whose residency is in Lake County in winter and out of state in the summer. The question may be better phrased if a clarifying statement was added stating, "If you live out of state during the summer months please mark 'out of state'."

The third question provided surprising percentages on how users found out about the book club services. Currently book club services are not advertised and it is up to the user to ask. Yet, only 12% stated that they asked. A very high percentage of users learned about book club services through "library staff" at 24%. This question was very beneficial in showing the best way to start selective advertisement of book club services in order to increase numbers in the chapter two book club. It may be beneficial to follow up this question with another question such as, "Why were you interested in joining the LLLG book club?"

The fourth question was successful at identifying book clubs that the Adult Services Supervisor was unaware existed in the Leesburg community. This question was used to give feedback on an immediate need to increase advertisement of the availability of book club kits to Lake County library book clubs and Leesburg community book clubs. By making book club members aware of this resource that they can share with other book clubs the question will become mostly obsolete if the survey is used next year (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, March 31, 2015).

The fifth question was successful at showing the effectiveness of the book club services meeting the goals of the service, and mission of the library. The question also helped define goals for the book club. The overall goal is to be a place to share a love of literature and discuss in a fun, intellectual, comfortable, and respectful environment. The user's responses also set goals such as a place of input from all members with varying backgrounds.

The sixth question was successful at outlining the expectations of the users. These expectations are some of the obstacles and challenges for the library. The four expectations mentioned in the responses were: attendance of members, library leadership, selection of books, and diversity/ input from all members. In each of these expectations the library is limited as to what it can do. The book club service requires registration in order to keep the group discussions small for comfort of patrons, available space, and availability of books. The restriction of book club member size makes the advertisement of the book club services risky but necessary for acquiring more members. The role of having a library staff member leading the book club services was an elective choice made by Linda because of her passion for book club services. The current Adult Services Supervisor does not see a need to make library leadership in the book clubs a job duty, and does not want to force staff to take over such a large responsibility if it is not their passion. She has encouraged book club members to take over leadership and book discussions. The selection of books is mostly controlled by the book club members. A part of the book club goals is to expand the users experience to various types of literature. Diversity and input from all members hinges on each book club members willingness to participate and allow contribution from other members. In each of these aspects there is little that the library can change but small things can be done to improve the services (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

The seventh question should be re-written to reduce the amount of questions and wording. According to Matthews (2007, p.67) "keep questions under 20 words in length." Question seven has thirty-four words. Out of the seventeen responses only three gave reflective information on how correspondence could be improved, improved, or met the user's needs. Majority of the responses were less than five words. In order to get a greater response the question should be reworded to be one question.

The eighth question was successful at quantifying the need for the book club services to continue in pursuing ways of improvement. The Adult Services Supervisor found the most value from this question. Follow up questions should be conducted to assess why the "overall program" received a majority "above average" rating instead of "excellent". Also the Adult Services Supervisor was curious as to why "library staff" had one rating of "average". It may be beneficial in the next year's survey to break down these categories into additional qualitative questions (Adult Services Supervisor, personal communication, April 28, 2015).

Conclusion:

Overall the user-centered assessment was successful at its purpose to determine if 2014-2015 book club procedures are effective at meeting customer expectations. Based on survey responses the book club services were effective at meeting customers' expectations to a certain point. Customers still desire a library staff leader, and may never be fully satisfied with services until one is provided. This assessment helped define the user's expectations of the book club services. Through these expectations areas of improvement were concluded to be library involvement, resources, marketing, and communication.

Reference

City of Leesburg. (2012). Leesburg Public Library Policy. Leesburg, FL: City of Leesburg.

Matthews, J.R. (2007). The Evaluation and Measurement of Library Services. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Spring 2015

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